Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

     Andrew Squire

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Notes 

 

 

Recent Paintings (Roger Billcliffe Gallery, Glasgow March 2013)

 

 

 

"A thought-provoking and elegant series of paintings..........

Andrew trained as an architect and his background is reflected

both in the style of his paintings and their content. Their apparent

simplicity, with broad planes of colour and simple shapes are today

infused with his concerns for the environment - since his last

exhibition here he has emerged as a painter with strong ecological

convictions.

His deceptively simple compositions, with their minimalist
approach

combine with his bold choice of colours to mark him out from the

crowd. A long-time admirer of Craigie Aitchison, Andrew uses

accessible, contemporary images to create a symbolic language

of his own.

 

These simple yet enigmatic images of birds, beasts, and human

myth become a disarming reflection on what links us, and

separates us, as  species."
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Birds (World Land Trust Gallery April 2012)

 

 

As an artist I’ve always been drawn to the challenge of capturing

the essentials of a subject as succinctly as possible. I have also

long been fascinated by icons as symbolic images which

represent not just the surface appearance of their subject, but also

that which lies beyond.   

Artists, like everyone else, have the choice of engaging with the

big issues or not. Probably the biggest issue now facing the

planet is global warming. We are already effectively too late to

prevent a 20C increase. Unless we in the developed world take

immediate and radical action, we will almost certainly be too late

to prevent an even more catastrophic 40C increase.   

Artwork won’t save the planet, but it can make a small contribution

to changing our thinking, and one good place to start seems to be

a celebration of biodiversity as a reminder that we are part of a

system much bigger than ourselves.  Human willingness to pillage

the environment probably hasn’t changed since we first emerged

as a species, some 15 million years ago. What has changed,

exponentially, is our comprehensive ability to wreck the eco-

system, and our growing disconnection from natural rhythms and

cycles. That is precisely why the World Land Trust is so important,

as it works with local partners to conserve threatened land and

protect wildlife habitats across the globe.

March 2012

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Following my growing commitment to ecology and sustainability,

my artwork is continuing to evolve steadily away from an

anthropocentric perspective, towards geocentrism. Put plainly, &

despite the subtext of the last 2,500 years of Western culture,

humans and their doings are not the centre of the universe, but

simply a rather troublesome part of a much wider whole.

February 2012

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Andrew's Ark  

 

(Thompson's Gallery April 2009  in association with the World Land Trust )

 

 

“Evocative, iconic images of birds & beasts”  

The Ecologist  

 

 

“Vivid paintings in their own right…with current environmental

concerns ever more urgent,  the timing of the show could not be

bettered” 

Galleries Magazine  

 

 

"If an important part of conservation is to see nature differently

and value it in new and different ways, then Andrew’s Ark provokes

just the right response.” 

Bruce Pearson,

WLT Council Member & former President of the Society of Wildlife Artists

 

_______________________________________________

 

 

The theme of much of my work has been a contemplation of the

boundaries of the tangible world and that which lies beyond,

using a visual language of isolated iconic & archetypal images,

often of animals and birds, carefully placed in their pictorial space.

 

 

What is becoming unavoidably obvious is that, as the real

environment of these animals and birds is being traumatised and

trashed by climate change and by more direct human intervention,

a great many of them are now threatened or endangered.

 

 

Individually and collectively these iconic creatures are taking on

an important new role, as symbols of a looming planetary

catastrophe.

 

February 2009

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Extract from a conversation:

 

 

" The starting point is the belief that there is something beyond

the material world – something Other. Essentially this is the

territory where all spirituality is rooted, whether organised religion

or unfocussed secular feeling.

 

 

 A lot of my painting has been exploring the boundaries between

the 2 places – sometimes directly, sometimes more tangentially.

Lines from “heaven”, steps & stairs leading into the sky, doorways

& windows from one place to another – these are all metaphors

for a crossing of those boundaries, just as they were in the early

Renaissance (cf Fra Angelico’s Annunciation). I think much of the

importance of Craigie Aitchison’s work has been in using simple,

accessible and contemporary means to re-establish that symbolic

language – and that is a path that I make no apologies for

following.

 

 

 To digress for a moment, apart from those direct metaphors, I

think the bridge between the 2 places can also be expressed by

colour, and by iconic imagery – of animals etc, of everyday

objects, as well as spiritual paraphernalia such as chalices &

candles.

 

 

 A theologian friend is very clear about this concept of

Otherness – much clearer than he is about the existence of God.

He is feels strongly that certain images (and pieces of music,

poetry etc) act as a stepping stone between the material here &

now and that which lies beyond. What is reassuring to me is that

a theological scholar has arrived at the same conclusion, and

that it’s not just the territory of woolly minded artists ................."

June 2007

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In recent years Andrew has travelled and exhibited widely, with

residencies in Iceland, Canada and Nepal. These experiences

have fed into his development of a wide-ranging visual language,

reflecting the complexity of human perceptions. His deceptively

simple paintings have eclectic roots, drawing variously on the

elemental space & light of Western Scotland, the inner landscape 

of the subconscious, and iconic images of birds and beasts.

 

 

Beautifully composed and making confident use of the visual

silence of empty space, there is a recurring contemplative quality

and stillness in the work which reaches past the here and now to

something beyond.

 

Thompson's Gallery   Sept 2005

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